Tag Archives: Montreal



Jews singing Arabic. Arabs singing Hebrew. Right wing religious man joining Arab-Jewish party. Moroccan music royalty. Avrum Burg, Sami Elmaghribi and lots of music on this episode of Shtetl.



You won’t see Miss Me’s face but you can see her art all over the city walls. Check out street artist Miss Me on Shtetl and hear her rendition of the kol nidre.



Tamara Filyavich was born in the currently contested Crimea of Ukraine. Tune in to hear her story & how she navigates the tricky territory of identity. Is she Ukrainian? Jewish? Canadian?



Ian Sternthal is fighting the good fight when it comes to the battle of the book. Young independent publisher, Ian Sternthal has tales to tell on Shtetl on the Shortwave.



How fashionable are sexual ethics and workers rights? On today’s episode we talk with Oren Safdie: son of architecht Moshe Safdie, cousin of Dov Charney, and the Montrealer who wrote Unseamly a disturbing play about the politics of sexual harassment …



Short story magician Etgar Keret talks politics, dog shit & more. And Eloge Butera talks about witnessing the Truth & Reconciliation Commission in Montreal.



It was 1942 and Colman and Greenbaum were eager to fight Hitler. But first they’d have to make it through basic training. Not an easy feat for these kibbitzers. Read Colman’s true account of their mishaps and misdemeanours.



Shtetl gets in Le Mood for Montreal’s Festival of Jewish Learning, Arts and Culture. Liel Leibovitz, Leonard Cohen, satellites and celebrities, Jewish pirates, Punk Jews, Death Row Jews; and the “a-pork-alypse” today on Shtetl on the Shortwave.



Four-piece Montreal-based rock band First You Get the Sugar (referencing a Simpsons quote!) has been described as new wave, post-punk, ‘60s pop, classic rock, and ‘70s funk/soul.



You can probably count on your hands the number of friends and family members who speak fluent Yiddish. But back in 1931, ninety-nine-percent of Montreal’s Jews reported that Yiddish was their mother tongue. Find out more about the history of Yiddish culture and activism at Rebecca Margolis’ book launch.